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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
." >> this is bbc world news america. i m.j. and o'brien. britain recognizes the main opposition group as the governing authority, but will it break the stalemate? still on alert in norway, the suffering from last week's attacks continue to grip the country as the government promises an investigation. and counting down to the olympics, with just one year to go. london is busy getting ready. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of nato bombing and continuing combat on the ground, the international effort to remove moammar gaddafi from power got another boost today. britain declared but another governing authority and expel the remaining diplomats from london. this follows the move by the u.s. and paves the way to unfreezing millions in dollars. but will it make a difference on the ground? john simpson reports. >> 6:00 in the morning in the mountains. spies have warned of a buildup of pro gaddafi forces nearby, but these are not trained soldiers. they are just a bunch of volunteers. hours pass, and the gaddafi troops do not attack. the rebels w
on the ground? we have this report. >> the government now is a significant boost for them. britain is following the u.s. and france in intensify the pressure on the libyan regime. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government, and we are inviting the transitional council to appoint a new diplomatic convoy to take over the embassy in london. >> the libyan embassy in london is in nights bridge. the ambassador here was expelled in may. now, they have three days to leave. the other diplomats must go, as well. and they must deal with the frozen assets, now controlled by opponents of the regime. this is an important symbolic moment, especially for the small group of rebel supporters, who come here but to replace the flag of the gaddafi regime with their alone. the question is, what difference will it make on the ground? joining the demonstrators today, a former financial adviser at the embassy. >> this is very positive. it is a psychological boost, and the council will be able to use those funds to help the libyan people, and hopefully, this is just the beginning. >>
culture in britain. there is no evidence the "new york post" published stories similar to those published in "news of the world" or "the sun." it does at the least raise questions about the journalism here. >> in other news, security forces in syria have shot at least 20 protesters across the country. throughout the day, thousands of people staged some of the biggest protests so far against the rule of president asisad. roughly 1400 civilians have died since the uprising began in march. in egypt, thousands rallied in the two largest cities. five months after president mubarak was removed from power, they are becoming impatient with the interim military rulers. they are demanding that police officers accused of killing protesters during the uprising be put on trial. in libya, the fighting continues. the main opposition group was given a diplomatic boost today. the united states and other nations have recognized it as the governing authority in the country. the announcement came from istanbul where secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with other members of the group. for more on th
not have any words. she is sad. >> what they want is for colonel gaddafi to stand trial. this week, britain shifted its position. they said that colonel gaddafi must leave power, he could stay on in the country if that is what the people want. look at what happened here. look at the scale of destruction. hundreds of people died in the battle for misrata and they cannot forget or forgive. what they want is justice. however much britain frowns on america on a quick settlement, it is difficult to imagine a solution that is acceptable for the government in tripoli and the people of misrata. the city is still under attack. a petrol depot struck by rockets this week, this is hardly conducive for peace talks. the truth is that misrata remains on a war footing, hundreds of its men are dug-in, stretching for miles along the latest from lines. they are a little bit more organized, better equipped, even if they cannot always see who they are firing at. they plan to go all the way to tripoli. progress has been slower than britain and the west hoped-for. the fighting, not talking, that is the concentrat
, damaged by a phone hacking scandal, "news of the world," closes as of britain's best-selling newspaper after a run of over 100 years. >> certain individuals did not live up to the standards and qualities of journalism that we believe in. >> medical breakthroughs, for the first time scientists have been able to make an organ at of synthetic materials. will we have -- the end of an era is here for the space program. will mother nature cooperate? >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. it is the scandal which has stunned britain and today came the biggest bombshell of all. "news of the world," has been shut down. this has been in print since the 1800's. this comes after a public outcry. news corp. controls 40% of newspaper distribution in the u.k. and has a worldwide reach. >> this has been the famous newspaper in britain but the "news of the world," is being shut because it became famous for all the wrong reasons. this afternoon, the chairmen of news international announced that this sunday's edition will be the last and all revenues will go to good causes. it i
closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and
applications for similar cases against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the pape
. they cracked the german code. >> there were some of the darkest days of the second world war, but britain's survival was in the balance. out in the a plan to, and -- in the atlantic on shipping convoys were bringing the supplies and munitions, but they were being sought by german submarines. it off heather's nottie germany threatening to win. this is blechly park. seven years ago, these were some of britain's most vital establishments. it was here that they broke the code of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crossword lynn was and others were brought together. -- crossword linguists and others were brought together. the british built this to help break the code. it was called colossus. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken the codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could not happen in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost the war without it. is that important. >> 70 years after the code breakers worked in total secrecy, their work, which is -- which is said shortened the war by perhaps two years, received t
that. >> we have no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comf
for joining us. now to the hacking scandal which continues in britain. but those even further. after gordon brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story was published giving both sides of the hearing. he attacked the way it reported that his you
. international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million accounts. the united states early have five. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring alarm bells. >> they have been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead, and we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning to put things away, because we need that to happen rapidly. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken control in areas controlled or influenced militant islamists. now they say a ban has been lifted, but politics are complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. so the familiar images of hunger and the predictable scramble for money and resources. >> for more on efforts to assist those suffering from drought, i am joined by the deputy assistant secretary for refugees and migration. you have just returned from the refugee camps of eastern africa. tell us what you saw. >> i have been too many refugee camps across the world. i can tell you is among the worst i have ever seen. the rate coming into the camps is very high. it is 1300 a day into
the celebrations. and although the blood has been pulled on britain's most scandalous newspaper, hacking continues. >> america will continue the dream with the space shuttle liftoff. >> the u.s. space program reaches the end of an era with hundreds of thousands watching on. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. just an hour ago, the world welcomed a new nation when the republic of south sudan officially regained -- officially gained its independence. it comes after a brutal civil war and a peace deal with the south and north. celebrations are already under way, but there are huge challenges, including continued violence along the border. >> the final march 2 independence. i will never leave my land until i die, the song heard throughout the decades of war with north sudan. and now they have their land and south sudan is born. ♪ [singing] ♪ >> with a little help the reverse of the brand new national anthem. -- they rehearse the brand new national anthem. because of the war, south sudan will start out as one of the poorest nations on the planet. >> when we were ru
of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians are simply too scared to confront the murdoch empire? >> a british company could not go and buy anything more than 20%, he has 30% of british sky. it is been argued that he has far too much power and they assume that his papers decide whether they will become the prime minister or the next government. that is totally unacceptable. >> it was your former boss who was one of the first to cozy up to rupert murdoch. >> if you ask him, and you can ask gordon brown. they used to be played up funny enough by rebecca brooks. they have far too much influence and they have produced this kind of scandal and it must top. >> are you confident that this will stop now that the public is so outraged by who else has been hacked? >> the public is rightfully outraged by this. there is a failure by the commission. the police have been cozying up. you can be assured that parliament would like a piece of this and across the party lines. we have to do something about the media moguls like mr. murdoch who are saying that everything will be ad
industry. bbc news. >> while the pressure continues to build in britain, as you have seen here in the united states, there are growing calls for investigations into the activities of news corporation. joining me is our washington correspondent. thank you for coming in. who is calling for this investigation, and what would be the focus? >> their two separate areas. it comes from congress, where interest has picked up suddenly. the first and most sensitive area is on the issue of whether or not there was an attempt by a news of the world reporter to hack into or obtain the information that might lead to the ability to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. and various senators and one member of the house, who runs the moment security committee, have called for investigations. he has written to the fbi, calling for an investigation. the second issue which is separate is whether or not the payments through allegedly made in britain by members of the "news of the world," employees of new corp., whether those payments actually breach the foreign corrupt practices act. america tak
response has been mixed. 22 million pounds have been given from great britain, with half of that from the united states. those who sent 1.6 million pounds are accused of a nut -- ignoring the alarm. >> this is overall, dangerously inadequate. we expect others to contribute. others are beginning to put their shoulders to the wheel. this is happening rapidly and vigorously. >> money is not the only problem. there is a militant islamic group, that has made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate directly. the ban has been lifted but the politics are complicated, and the aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. and so the images of hunger and helplessness, and the scramble for money and access, as the famine bites into somalia. >> in other news, the leader of ireland has launched an attack on the vatican, for encouraging the leadership not to report pedophilia by the priests. he says this is a function of elitism and our system that is present in catholicism. libya says the removal of gadaffi from power is not on the table. in afghanistan, forces have handed over sec
. >> that is the latest from britain, where the pressure is mounting. the f.b.i. is probing allegations that newscorp tried to hack the phone records of victims of 9/11. concerns were raised by peter king, and joining him was democrat bruce brailey, who asked the house oversight committee to act. thank you for joining us. tyou say in your letter you have concerns about allegations that hacking extended to u.s. citizens. >> we do know there are concerns about the possibility that voicemails from 9/11 victims were obtained. there is a chance u.s. citizens may have had their emails accessed by newscorp. because of the alarm about this issue, i joined peter king and louise slaughter, from new york with a strong interest in protecting those victims. they are makin gsurg sure there is no violation of u.s. law, to provide the oversight the constitution requires. >> there was a possibility of victims of this. >> this is not a fishing expedition. the chair of the homeland security committee. they would not ask the f.b.i. to investigate this. for those uof us with a sense of decency, we have to push for answer
as early as 2009. britain has joined france in suggesting that colonel qaddafi should remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. william hague said that although britain's preference was for colonel qaddafi to go into exile, it was up to the libyan people to decide. now, to the u.s. debt talks which are locked in a bitter standoff. with just a little more than a week to go until the august 2 deadline when the u.s. must lift the debt ceiling or risk default, both sides are digging in for a fight. today, rival proposals were rolled out and tonight, the president will address the nation in a televised address. but among those who think the tea party republicans should hold their ground is freshman representative joe walsh and he joins me now from capitol hill. thank you very much for joining us. are you really prepared to risk the country going into default over this? >> no. no one wants to risk default. nobody up here in this town wants to do that, jane. we just want to make sure we get this right, that we get the solution right. we met with a couple of the credit agencies last w
, of course, but today, britain's saluted ronald reagan. the foreign secretary brought a message from lady thatcher, who had hoped to attend but was not well enough to attend. >> ronald reagan was a great president and a great man, a true leader for our kind. he held clear principles and acted upon them with purpose. >> and ronald reagan's legacy was hailed by condoleezza rice as an example for today, particularly in the middle east. >> it gives us hope and optimism to continue to stand for those who are still trapped in tyranny. >> the reputation of some political leaders fades with time, but for ronald reagan, it seems to be the reverse. critics often regarded him as a second bit actor who had no business trying to play a part on the world stage. those critics are much less vocal now, and ronald reagan has certainly found a place in the sun. bbc news, grosvenor square. >> ronald reagan being honored in london, and before we go, cartop story, hugo chavez has returned to venezuela after being treated for cancer in cuba. he is now addressing a crowd outside the presidential palace in caraca
a splash. she switched last year from representing kenya to start swimming for great britain. her goal is to represent the team at the olympics. she often trains two times a day, once before school and once after. >> getting up at 5:00 in the morning is not get any easier. >> she started swimming at the age of four while she was living in kenya. she was born in the u.k. and in 2007 decided to return here. she boarded at plymouth college where she befriended a diving gold medalist. she has now moved in with her got parents to set up for the olympics. while most teenagers find it difficult to drag themselves out of bed, she has been here since the crack of dawn. she's incredibly committed to his swimming but she is also very focused on her school work. after a cup of coffee with her friend, it is off to school where she is studying for a levels. double economics is followed by double politics in which she is contemplating a career beyond the swimming pool. she has her work perfect and france to catch up with before squeezing in a driving lesson, all before the end of school. what sometim
, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." the scandal is spreading. from britain's royal family to its former prime minister, the allegations of hacking by rupert murdoch's media empire could have a global impact. east africa's drought is labeled the world's worst, but with so many in need, why is one refugee camp in kenya completely empty? and it is a question of identity. for native americans, the system has long helped define their tribes, but times have changed. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. another day and yet more extraordinary revations in the hacking scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's media empire. first came a story that the news of the world reporters tried to buy top-secret information about the royal family from one of its protection officers. in a separate case, another murdoch paper is alleged to have targeted personal liberation of the former prime minister when he was chancellor. >> the head of state, the royal family, her and their security is the duty of the police in the royal protection branch. the integr
of their patients in the clinic's death book. >> is anyone exempt from britain's phone hacking? the scandal spreads from the pages of rupert murdoch's newspaper to the walls of parliament. >> the shuttle has cleared the tower. -- the tunnel. >> it is countdown for the space shuttle final launch. we hear from one at nasa veteran who was there from the start. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. aid agencies have issued an urgent appeal for help for millions affected by drought in east africa. the crisis has been particularly cruel to somalia, kenya, uganda, and ethiopia. more than 300,000 people have walked days to get to the refugee camp in kenya. ben brown has been there for a week. >> among the refugees at this camp, there are hundreds of lost children and orphans. some got separated from their families on the long walk from somalia. others, like abdi and his sister, no longer have parents. their father died in somalia's civil war. last month, their mother was killed as well. >> it is better here. back in somalia, there was war. we have no relatives there, so we fled her
from australia to the u.s., to britain. >> thank you very much for joining us. in mumbai today, three coordinated bombings targeted the financial capital leaving at least 21 people dead and injuring more than a hundred. the blasts are the worst attack in the country since the 2008 attack. we have been to the location of why the explosions. >> this is one of three locations where explosions have taken place. just behind this police cordon, a bus stop where a vehicle was detonated. two of their class took place at about 7:00 p.m. local time in highly densely populated areas. lots of traffic around peak times. we are hearing of many injuries. the injured have been taken to local hospitals. the party according to the police and those of been coming to these areas saying that the parties at the moment is to make sure that the injured are taking care of. it is yet to be unknown who is behind these attacks and what is taking place and whether there is collation to any of those attacks that took place in 2008. -- whether there is any correlation to any of those attacks that took place in 2008
can make a splash. she switched last year from representing kenya to start swimming for great britain. her goal is to be at the olympics. she often trains two times a day, once before school and once after. >> getting up at 5:00 in the morning is not get easier. >> she started swimming at the age of four when she was with her family. she was born in the u.k. and decided to return here to pursue her dream. she boarded at plumas college. -- plymouth college. while most teenagers find it hard to drag themselves out of bed in the morning, she has been years since the crack of dawn. she is incredibly committed to his swimming but she is focused on her school work. after a cup of coffee, it is off to school where she is studying for her a levels. she has her work to perfect and friends to catch up with. this is all before the end of school. >> sometimes i get really stressed and fed up. you have to deal with this situation that you are given and you have to deal with both of these things. >> she made a contentious start before representing england. she has struggled. she took a five week br
day brings a new twist in the scandal that has engulfed britain. today was no exception. first the news of the second high-profile resignations and scotland yard in 24 hours when john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former "news of the world" reporter that alleged widespread hacking was found dead. the circumstances are not believed to be suspicious. nick robinson reports. >> he resigned just a day after his boss, commissioner paul stephenson. both are paying the price for failing to get to grips with the hacking scandal, so says the mayor of london. >> i have just come off of the phone with yates and tendered his resignation. >> insisted both men jumped and were not pushed. he made it clear he did everything to encourage them. >> there are issues and questions. it will make it difficult for them to continue to do their job in the way they wanted. >> john yates began the day determined not to resign. he told colleagues he would not submit to trial by media. he explained why he was going. >> we are truly accountable. those of us to take on the most difficult jobs ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)

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